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Six-year multicenter study on short-term peripheral venous catheters-related bloodstream infection rates in 204 intensive care units of 57 hospitals in 19 cities of India: International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) findings

In American Journal of Infection Control
By: Rosenthal VD [Corresponding Author].
Contributor(s): Gupta D | Rajhans P | Myatra SN | Muralidharan S | Mehta Y | Kharbanda M | Rodrigues C | Dwivedy A | Shah S | Poojary A | Todi SK | Chabukswar S | Bhattacharyya M | Ramachandran B | Ramakrishnan N | Purkayasta SK | Sakle AS | Kumar S | Warrier AR | Kavathekar MS | Sahu S | Mubarak A | Modi N | Jaggi N | Gita N | Mishra SB | Sahu S | Jawadwala B | Zala D | Zompa T | Mathur P | Nirkhiwale S | Vadi S | Singh S | Agarwal M | Sen N | Karlekar A | Punia DP | Kumar S | Gopinath R | Nair PK | Chakravarthy M | Sandhu K | Kambam C | Mohanty SK | Varaiya A | Pandya N | Subhedar VR | Vanajakshi MR | Singla D | Patel M.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: 2020Description: .Subject(s): Antibiotic resistance | Device-associated infections | Hospital infection | Mortality | Peripheral line-associated bloodstream infections | Surveillance In: American Journal of Infection Control Vol. 48, no. 9, p. 1001-1008.Summary: BACKGROUND: Short-term peripheral venous catheters-related bloodstream infections (PVCR-BSIs) rates have not been systematically studied in developing countries, and data on their incidence by number of device-days are not available. METHODS: Prospective, surveillance study on PVCR-BSI conducted from September 1, 2013 to May 31, 2019 in 204 intensive care units (ICUs), members of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC), from 57 hospitals in 19 cities of India. We applied US INICC definition criteria and reported methods using the INICC Surveillance Online System. RESULTS: We followed 7,513 ICU patients for 296,893 bed-days and 295,795 short term peripheral venous catheter (PVC)-days. We identified 863 PVCR-BSIs, amounting to a rate of 2.91/1,000 PVC-days. Mortality in patients with PVC but without PVCR-BSI was 4.14%, and 11.59% in patients with PVCR-BSI. The length of stay in patients with PVC but without PVCR-BSI was 4.13 days, and 5.9 days in patients with PVCR-BSI. The micro-organism profile showed 68% of gram negative bacteria: Escherichia coli (23%), Klebsiella spp (15%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5%), and others. The predominant gram-positive bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus (10%). CONCLUSIONS: PVCR-BSI rates found in our ICUs were much higher than rates published from industrialized countries. Infection prevention programs must be implemented to reduce the incidence of PVCR-BSIs.
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Address for Corresponding Author: victor_rosenthal@inicc.org.

BACKGROUND:
Short-term peripheral venous catheters-related bloodstream infections (PVCR-BSIs) rates have not been systematically studied in developing countries, and data on their incidence by number of device-days are not available.

METHODS:
Prospective, surveillance study on PVCR-BSI conducted from September 1, 2013 to May 31, 2019 in 204 intensive care units (ICUs), members of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC), from 57 hospitals in 19 cities of India. We applied US INICC definition criteria and reported methods using the INICC Surveillance Online System.

RESULTS:
We followed 7,513 ICU patients for 296,893 bed-days and 295,795 short term peripheral venous catheter (PVC)-days. We identified 863 PVCR-BSIs, amounting to a rate of 2.91/1,000 PVC-days. Mortality in patients with PVC but without PVCR-BSI was 4.14%, and 11.59% in patients with PVCR-BSI. The length of stay in patients with PVC but without PVCR-BSI was 4.13 days, and 5.9 days in patients with PVCR-BSI. The micro-organism profile showed 68% of gram negative bacteria: Escherichia coli (23%), Klebsiella spp (15%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5%), and others. The predominant gram-positive bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus (10%).

CONCLUSIONS:
PVCR-BSI rates found in our ICUs were much higher than rates published from industrialized countries. Infection prevention programs must be implemented to reduce the incidence of PVCR-BSIs.

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